Daily Dose: The Rams' Breakthrough Performer

Each weekday, theRams.com will be taking a look around the internet for the top Rams headlines of the day. Here's a look at what's out there for Tuesday, December 18th about your Los Angeles Rams.

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BIGGEST BREAKTHROUGH

ESPN's NFL Nation Reporters picked one breakthrough performer for each NFL team. For the Rams, ESPN's Lindsey Thiry chose second-year safety out of Boston College John Johnson.

Here's what Thiry had to say about the Rams' leader in interceptions:

Johnson is a second-year pro whom the Rams drafted in the third round from Boston College. He made his way into the starting lineup five games into his rookie season, but in 2018, Johnson has taken his play to the next level. He has intercepted a team-best four passes, has 10 pass deflections and is second on the team in total tackles with 106.

Johnson's 14 tackles against the Eagles on Sunday night marked a career high for the defensive back.

For each team's breakthrough performer, click here.

GURLEY THROUGH THE AIR

Running back Todd Gurley had a season-high 10 receptions on Sunday against the Eagles.

Gurley's 10 receptions matches his career-high for a single game. The back caught 10-of-13 targets in his team's NFC West-clinching performance against the Titans last season.

POINTS ALLOWED

On Tuesday, Pro Football Talk's Michael David Smith pointed out a sore spot for the Rams over the last several weeks. Smith compared L.A.'s points allowed over the last six weeks with the season's hot start.

"In fact, over the last six games, the Rams have allowed an NFL-high 188 points, and the Saints have allowed an NFL-low 74 points.

As great as the Rams were in the first half of this season — and they were great, with an 8-0 record and a +109 point differential — they've been mediocre at best over the second half of the season, with a 3-3 record and a -4 point differential."

The Rams have given up 111 of the 188 points since Week 9 to the Saints, Chiefs, and Bears, who lead their respective divisions.

To view the entire article, click here.

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